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One thing that I learned from Herman Holtz's (Hermann Holz) many books on "consulting contracts" is the idea of task orders. An umbrella contract sets the ground rules for one or more individually-scoped-and-priced task orders to be issued during the fulfillment of the contract. It is further specified that all revisions must be accompanied by ...


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Many similarly-structured projects – where legal contracts hold sway, adopt one or the other of two strategies: (1) Formal Change Orders: The parties must expressly negotiate each change to the contract. (2) Formal Burn-Limits: The parties may informally bargain within the scope of the contract so long as the total amount of money spent doing so does not ...


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As per the wording in your question: And I got a feedback that solution design is approved but under one condition!! That to add 3 points from the last document I did analysis for. So it sounds like they have recognised that that their request is bigger than the original scope, and yet they want it for no additional cost. This should be seen as an ...


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If you have a change process defined, and your customer is sidestepping the process to squeeze scope in without paying for the impacts, then you say no. You're a party to the contract and you get to say no if you think the contract is being violated. It's the job of the PM. EDIT to address comments: They are right to say the change is needed...if indeed it ...


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Why do you want to reject what the customer is asking? If your contract or your way of working obliges you to turn away work that the customer wants and is presumably willing to pay for then perhaps your business model is broken and that is not the customer's fault. The second thing to think about is that on any project (I'm assuming software development) ...


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