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1

Here's what I would do next: "take your concerns back to them." Alert them to the fact that you perceive that the standards are not being "properly" adhered to, and "ask them why." Listen very carefully to what they say. The technical issues and concerns, particularly with SQL, have already been brought forward in this thread ...


2

As you wrote, it's likely a combination of education and process task. The coding standard needs to be understood, digested and practiced before it becomes a habit and part of the professional ethos. I find that Definitions of Done are very useful to educate the teams and get these habits embedded in the normal way of working. You could add a dedicated ...


1

In the last sprint, there were some standards that were missed by the Developer, and also missed by the Reviewer. Why it was missed? Was it due to lack of time or lack of intention? If it is due to lack of time, then when you plan next sprint, the development team should keep aside estimates to make sure they check that the code they develop is adhering to ...


0

Project management normally includes a quality management plan; having coding standards is one of the steps, but you've got to plan a way to do quality review and acceptance. Some teams break out the quality acceptance function into a separate team. Scrum teams (as I understand them) accept the responsibility for delivery an acceptable quality product as ...


5

In my experience the most effective coding standards are those that are driven directly by the developers. An approach I have seen work well is to have a developer community of practice that discusses coding standards and agrees them by consensus. By introducing standards in this way the developers have a buy-in to them being successful. If they feel a ...


7

In order to be cared about, standards must be understood. You say that a checklist[...]/checkboxes [are not] ideal because On previous teams, the coding standards were like an ethos that was upheld by the Application Development Manager, believed in by the team, and taught to new Devs when onboarded. What I take from this is that your primary concern is ...


2

In this case, the easiest solution would be to use some linters for the code you produce, be it SQL or something else. See also: Lint (software) List of tools for static code analysis These tools will automate some of the rules, but they only cover syntax. You still need people to agree together on a standard of quality and then stick to it because it's ...


4

Depending on whom you ask, there is no 'best' way to approach this. There are, broadly speaking, two 'good' ways to approach this; Waterfall with a Fixed Price contract, or agile with a Time and Materials contract. Time and Materials T&M is what I personally would recommend, though depending on the client (especially government), it might not be accepted....


1

Preface Since this question was posted on Project Managment Stack Exchange and not on The Workplace or some other relevant site, the only valid way to answer this from a project management perspective is to focus on organizational and project management responsibilities. That means trimming away a lot of the non-essential parts of your question, and focusing ...


2

You need to attack this problem on multiple fronts: First, offer to pay for classes that teach the practices and reasons for using them. Offer a bonus and/or pay increase to any of them that earn certificates. Give that no more than two months to start getting some traction. You may find that some of them are willing to put forth at least some effort. Plug ...


9

Simply telling your subordinates to do something they can't see the benefit from is a recipe for disaster, which you already acknowledge, so make it fun for them. Gamification may not be easy for you to do, but can pan out to smooth out other, rougher, spots. In a study conducted by Sharp et al. (2009), the researchers suggest the most influential factor on ...


1

From your post, it comes across as the entire team is not on board. Therefore, it isn't them; it's you and your management. How is the team pulling work? How are estimates being handled, by whom? Are the consequences of technical debt an actual management concern? Will new development be halted until all this technical debt is corrected?


-2

Put them on Performance Improvement Plans. They're currently not performing adequately, and you've got a list of ways in which their performance is deficient. Fortunately, there's a tool for improving performance that utilizes exactly those sorts of lists: the Performance Improvement Plan. Motivation is classified into two types, intrinsic and extrinsic, and ...


6

It sounds like you are stressed up because of this. You need to get this stress out of you. Here's what I would recommend: It sounds like the team doesn't know the importance of all the technical issues you have pointed out. There are two ways of making people understand: Make them fix those issues and then track results You take care of those fixes and ...


38

I would like them to understand why I want to do something. [...] Any advice? Don't theorize, show them. Their current state of mind is that they know what they do works. And you come over and tell them that theoretically this is bad. You will never win anyone over by telling they are doing a bad job, while you could do a much better one. Everybody can say ...


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