New answers tagged

3

What you're referring to is not CI/CD* - it's automation of build & deployment procedure. Basically a Deployment Pipeline. The way it alleviates your problems is: You stop needing your Ops constantly. If Deployment Pipeline is done right in many situations it could work for years without the maintenance. This allows your Devs to build and your QA to ...


1

First of all, how are tasks managed? What are the required permissions? Intuitively, for most small and medium-sized projects, I would probably keep them in one, but without details, it is hard to give a definite opinion. Another option is to keep separate Jira projects for each team and group them into a portfolio with a Jira addon like BigPicture what will ...


1

CI/CD Tools and Processes Don't Mitigate Bus Factor Risk I'm working on a project that has no CI/CD. We have only one person who builds the code and deploys it to staging/production...What would be the key points to show how CI/CD would ease the pain of staff losses or extended absences where the staff member is unreachable? This is not really a question ...


1

It's not the use of CI/CD that makes it easier to handle the absence of key staff. Instead, it's the practices that enable CI/CD. Practices such as automated tests, automated builds, and pair and mob programming. Having automated tests means that you have tests captured as some kind of code or script. Code needs to be very specific in terms of what to ...


0

I would suggest you start by thinking about what is involved in providing insurance. Then, imagine you are starting a new company that is going to be selling insurance. What would you need to do to sell your first insurance policy? These steps would then feed in to the phases of the project. What requirements would you need to gather before starting? What ...


1

TL;DR How does project management address the issue of managing people with differing abilities? I don't think there's a single, canonical answer to this question. The approach depends on the project management framework, the skills and experience of the project leadership, and the company's culture. As just one example, Scrum side-steps the problem of ...


0

There are a few factors to consider. One would be the type of team. If the team is self-organizing, the individuals would not be assigned to tasks. Instead, the team would determine who should be involved in what tasks and what their level of involvement is. In a more directed team, a manager may be responsible for assigning the work to people. The ...


0

You assign a human to a task the exact same way you assign a tool, albeit humans are more complex. The process of assignment is the same. If you need to cut something, you are not going to use the hammer. If you need to attach something to another thing, you are not going to use a chisel. As a PM, you know the work package that has to be done, you know the ...


2

Can you divide the project into phases and tasks? Can you provide a report, a review, prototype software and its code or some other deliverables of value for the customer? You may be able to mitigate the risks by doing that. Are you supposed to be an expert with the domain knowledge? Or you are expected to carry out research on behalf of the customer? Then ...


2

You can structure this as a T&M + Incentive contract The goal is to avoid the client as well as the vendor being too unhappy in the event of a failed project. To keep it simple, let us say that you need to spend 160 hours on this project and that your T&M charges are typically $100/hr. Let us also say that your resource cost is $60/hr and the rest is ...


7

Good answers; I thought I might provide a different view. I'd write my project as to test one (or more) hypothesis. At the end of this project, we will verify or refute the hypothesis that it is possible to X (e.g. spawn a root shell using CVE-YY-xxxx). I guess at a basic level, I'm challenging the validity of "then the client will have lost money ...


5

In addition to the good answers already given (T&M is the way to go) you should also put emphasis on customer expectation management. From the beginning, make it clear that you promise knowledge gain, not a finished product. If the problem is one where it is known that solutions exist (for example because the big players in the field have them) and you ...


3

I would expect any research project to be done on a daily or hourly rate. It's implicitly the nature of R&D that the work is what matters and the outcome is uncertain, so the work is what you should be paid for. A Kanban-style, continuous delivery approach makes sense for R&D: prioritise the items of value, inspect and adapt as you go.


20

No project has a 100% chance of success. So there's that. For R&D, the project itself is not the product. It is research and development. It's a service-oriented project. Therefore, you would be reimbursed for the service, not what is produced or not produced. The output for a service-oriented project is a change in state. For R&D, that state is ...


Top 50 recent answers are included