9

I don't have any solid evidence - our projects are much longer. At one point I did work for a company that required timekeeping to the 0.1 hour range. That lasted about six months before the accountants told the company President to stick to his own swim lane. Speaking as a PM, I would have the following concerns about timekeeping with a precision of 0.5%....


7

When is time tracking too detailed? When you ask the question about why you're tracking to that granularity and no one in your organization can tell you why. We track time in 15-minute increments. Why? Because that is what we've agreed to with certain clients.


7

I've always billed to the nearest half hour. Tracking to the minute like you do would be extremely demoralizing, especially if I had to account for any discrepancies. Standing up for a healthy short walk should not be penalized. I have often worked in environments where interruptions were usually important and somewhat frequent. Trying to track them to ...


7

The direct answer to your question is that how you bill your time to the client is not addressed in Scrum. Therefor there is no billing model that is expressly anti-scrum. If adding a place on the board where you track time is the easiest way for your team to keep tabs on it, feel free. Now, there are billing models that can incentivize anti-Scrum behaviors. ...


6

Scrum works best if you have good product ownership, fixed-length iterations and a stable team. If the backlog is determined by the client and the team is stable then (barring leave and unexpected absences) I would expect the cost per iteration to be fixed. So if you need to apportion cost per item then the right way is surely to divide the iteration cost (...


5

A tool won't save you. Discipline will. Other professionals, such as lawyers, do it all the time for decades, with accuracy, and without a fancy tool.


5

It depends on what is done with the information. I'd advise collecting the minimum you need. At my place we just record what project we were working on for the day but we only really care about whether time is being spent on a capex project or not so the lack of precision is not a problem. If it's being collected for something valuable and needs to be to ...


4

I think the fundamental question that isn't being asked is, "What is the purpose of time tracking?" Depending on your answer for your group should influence the answer. For my group, we work on very large features: an individual feature takes on average 9 months to 1 year to develop and around 2000 hours of estimated work. I view time-tracking to have 3 ...


4

TL; DR In general, logging is a symptom of a non-agile development process that proxies for a project manager's active engagement and situational awareness. It is also often a sign that the project is measuring the wrong thing, since "time consumed" is rarely a valid measure or predictor of results. When not used solely for contractual billing purposes, it ...


4

Analysis HR is going to use the breakdown. Mostly it would be an audit of the time spent and some insights into areas where people are spending time. This is a known anti-pattern. If the team is succeeding, then the Scrum Master (as part of the team) is contributing to its overall success. If the team is failing, then the Scrum Master (again, as part of ...


4

I'm confused. You say you bill hours to the client. By that I understand "hours of work". Scrum ceremonies are part of the work the team is doing. When you hold a daily standup for example, you do so in order for the team to coordinate their work in the sprint. You talk about work there, not the weather, or how your cat stuck its head into a jar ...


4

TL;DR Scrum is based on an empirical control methodology. While not directly stated in the Scrum Guide, it essentially posits a roughly-constant run rate for each Sprint, allowing predictable budgeting through estimating the number of Sprints that are likely needed to reach a "good enough" target. (See Agile Release Planning for more on this.) ...


3

If you need to track costs, track it at the Scrum Team level rather than at the individual level. A simple way to do this is to take a blended cost per person and multiply it by the number of people in the team and the duration of sprints. For example: Average cost of staff is £600 per day and Scrum Team 1 has 7 people in it and do a two week sprint. ...


3

One of the free option available is to use the browser extension named Jira Assistant available in below url. This extension has lot more useful features which not only helps to generate report, but also help to log your work on daily basis with notifications, calendar integrations and lot more cool features which helps both managers and team members in ...


3

Wonder if you really need to: understand the internal costs Maybe track it for a while, but don't force developers to track time unless it is absolutely necessary. Like billing clients per hour, but even then you could bill them on relative effort sizes and remove the need to track time. You might wonder why shouldn't developers track-time? Let’s take a ...


3

You can combine the "Automated Log Work for JIRA" with the "Smart Commit" features. So a minor manual work will be needed from the team, which is moving the task from open to in progress and when done commit the code and refer it to the Jira ticket. Jira will calculate the time the task took to finish automatically. You can then calculate the non-technical ...


3

It only makes sense if you are required to track time by outside requirements. For example if hours and minutes are billable or if you are on a government "cost plus" contract. Issue 1 of morale is to be expected. Professionals don't like to be treated that way. I have had to fill out time cards, but clocking in is generally not well received.


2

Unfortunately, I'm not aware that you can. It is a long awaited feature for Jira that I have voted on in the ticket referenced in the thread that Vadim has linked. The way I get around this on one project is to use 'sub-boards' for different roles. Not each team member needs to see what everyone else is doing all the time and may only need to see a small ...


2

I have worked in organizations that track time to 15 minute increments and those that don't track time at all. From a PM perspective I greatly prefer the former, because it is next to impossible to objectively estimate future effort if you don't have history of actual time spent. In my current organization we have to go through all sorts of contortions to ...


2

Find a new company... To directly answer your question, if there is not guidelines in place already then just make it up. Document in in a "legend" and create codes that are easy for you to understand. If the company has not provided you with any kind of standard for how to log this time, then there is a good chance they are just grasping at an illusion ...


2

You can use worklogAuthor and worklogDate parameters for your needs. Your query will be like: project = "My Project" AND worklogAuthor = currentUser() AND worklogDate = now() You will get all issues in which you logged some time today.


2

First of all, you might not be the first person to face this problem at your company. As each company has distinct scenarios and needs, they fastest approach is discussing the problem with other seasoned managers. In case historical information isn't available then it boils down to why you have to do it. If there isn't exhaustive reviews of hours, a "one ...


1

Regardless of the methodology or project management approach you use, you always tailor processes to the needs of organisation and project. Tracking time spent on meetings, communication and a thousand little things is most often a mission impossible. In these cases, I usually asked teams to keep a log of their activities throughout the day. This way I ...


1

The type of work you do, where you cut across many types of tasks in a supply and demand way, you should charge your time against a single level of effort task that cuts across the entire period of performance. You could certainly charge increments of time to each task in a very complex way but I suspect the business would eventually find that level of ...


1

While I agree with Barnaby that tracking time (or, really, tracking almost anything) at the Team level is better than at the individual level, I agree with you that tracking Time at all is not ideal. The best course of action is to convince upper management that this is a bad idea. The most effective way to do that, as you've already realized, is to have an ...


1

I would only worry about this if you really need to understand cost of goods sold, are doing billable work, or do accounting for software capitalization. It's better to just track team throughput using velocity metrics. It vastly simplifies estimating and scheduling and once it matures it is a much better predictor of future performance. All done without ...


1

TL;DR You are struggling because your JIRA ticketing is not aligned with your real-world process. In addition, you are trying to make your ticketing system your source of truth for time reporting into a separate system, which introduces a (possibly unnecessary) layer of indirection. Long-term, you should fix your process so that the tools you're using are ...


1

OK, a few suggestions: Scrum is designed to work with dedicated teams with a known velocity. This makes it easier to predict the capacity of the team in each sprint and hence makes it easier to plan. Ideally a Scrum team will work on one thing at a time, but in your situation it may be necessary to have them work on a mixture of project/BAU/support. Some ...


1

My approach would be: Let both developers log work on the issue they worked on together. It is the simple truth that if 2 developers worked for an hour on to then 2 hours are spent. The logged work is not time but effort. For everything the dev do that is not directly related to stories I would recommend "pooling tasks", e.g. a task "Meetings April" where ...


1

TL; DR It's usually best for a team to agree on a standardized glossary and a well-defined level of granularity for tracking and estimating, rather than defining these things on an individual basis. However, if you must go it alone, then generalizing activities into broad categories can be a useful technique. Use Broad (But Meaningful) Categories When ...


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